PHP Variables Dumping Variable Contents as Strings - Web Development and Design | Tutorial for Java, PHP, HTML, Javascript PHP Variables Dumping Variable Contents as Strings - Web Development and Design | Tutorial for Java, PHP, HTML, Javascript

Breaking

Post Top Ad

Post Top Ad

Wednesday, May 22, 2019

PHP Variables Dumping Variable Contents as Strings

PHP Variables





Dumping Variable Contents as Strings

Problem

You want to inspect the values stored in a variable. It may be a complicated nested array or object, so you can’t just print it out or loop through it.


Solution

Use var_dump(), print_r(), or var_export(), depending on exactly what you need. The var_dump() and print_r() functions provide different human-readable representations of variables. The print_r() function is a little more concise:

           $info = array('name' => 'frank', 12.6, array(3, 4));
           print_r($info);

prints:

           Array
           (
                   [name] => frank
                   [0] => 12.6
                   [1] => Array
                          (
                                 [0] => 3
                                 [1] => 4
                          )
           )

While this:

           $info = array('name' => 'frank', 12.6, array(3, 4));
           var_dump($info);

prints:

           array(3) {
                   ["name"]=>
                   string(5) "frank"
                   [0]=>
                   float(12.6)
                   [1]=>
                   array(2) {
                          [0]=>
                          int(3)
                          [1]=>
                          int(4)
                   }
           }

The var_export() function produces valid PHP code that, when executed, defines the exported variable:

            $info = array('name' => 'frank', 12.6, array(3, 4));
            var_export($info);

prints:

            array (
                   'name' => 'frank',
                   0 => 12.6,
                   1 =>
                   array (
                          0 => 3,
                          1 => 4,
                   ),
            )

Discussion

The three functions mentioned in the Solution differ in how they handle recursion in references. Because these functions recursively work their way through variables, if you have references within a variable pointing back to the variable itself, you would end up with an infinite loop unless these functions bailed out.

When var_dump() or print_r() has seen a variable once, it prints *RECURSION* instead of printing information about the variable again and continues iterating through the rest of the information it has to print. The var_export() function does a similar thing, but it prints null instead of *RECURSION* to ensure its output is executable PHP code.

Consider the arrays $user_1 and $user_2, which reference each other through their friend elements:

            $user_1 = array('name' => 'Max Bialystock',
                                      'username' => 'max');

            $user_2 = array('name' => 'Leo Bloom',
                                      'username' => 'leo');

            // Max and Leo are friends
            $user_2['friend'] = &$user_1;
            $user_1['friend'] = &$user_2;

            // Max and Leo have jobs
            $user_1['job'] = 'Swindler';
            $user_2['job'] = 'Accountant';

The output of print_r($user_2) is:

            Array
            (
                    [name] => Leo Bloom
                    [username] => leo
                    [friend] => Array
                           (
                                    [name] => Max Bialystock
                                    [username] => max
                                    [friend] => Array
                                            (
                                                    [name] => Leo Bloom
                                                    [username] => leo
                                                    [friend] => Array

                *RECURSION*
                                                    [job] => Accountant
                                            )
                                    [job] => Swindler
                           )
                    [job] => Accountant
            )

When print_r() sees the reference to $user_1 the second time, it prints *RECURSION* instead of descending into the array. It then continues on its way, printing the remaining elements of $user_1 and $user_2. The var_dump() function behaves similarly:

            array(4) {
                   ["name"]=>
                   string(9) "Leo Bloom"
                   ["username"]=>
                   string(3) "leo"
                   ["friend"]=>
                   &array(4) {
                         ["name"]=>
                         string(14) "Max Bialystock"
                         ["username"]=>
                         string(3) "max"
                         ["friend"]=>
                         &array(4) {
                                ["name"]=>
                                string(9) "Leo Bloom"
                                ["username"]=>
                                string(3) "leo"
                                ["friend"]=>
                                *RECURSION*
                                ["job"]=>
                                string(10) "Accountant"
                         }
                         ["job"]=>
                         string(8) "Swindler"
                   }
                   ["job"]=>
                   string(10) "Accountant"
           }

As does var_export(), but with null instead of *RECURSION*:

           array (
                   'name' => 'Leo Bloom',
                   'username' => 'leo',
                   'friend' =>
                   array (
                         'name' => 'Max Bialystock',
                         'username' => 'max',
                         'friend' =>
                         array (
                               'name' => 'Leo Bloom',
                               'username' => 'leo',
                               'friend' => NULL,
                               'job' => 'Accountant',
                         ),
                          'job' => 'Swindler',
                     ),
                      'job' => 'Accountant',
               )

The print_r() and var_export() functions accept a second argument which, if set to true tells the functions to return the string representation of the variable rather than printing it. To capture the output from var_dump(), however, you need to use output buffering:

             ob_start();
             var_dump($user);
             $dump = ob_get_contents();
             ob_end_clean();

This puts the results of var_dump($user) in $dump.


No comments:

Post a Comment

Post Top Ad