Web Development and Design | Tutorial for Java, PHP, HTML, Javascript: jquery-plugins-examples

Web Development and Design | Tutorial for Java, PHP, HTML, Javascript: jquery-plugins-examples
Showing posts with label jquery-plugins-examples. Show all posts
Showing posts with label jquery-plugins-examples. Show all posts

JAVA SCRIPT - Convert Your Library to a jQuery Plug-in

Convert Your Library to a jQuery Plug-in


Problem

You want to convert your library methods and functions into a jQuery plug-in for use by others. 

Solution

If your plug-in has one or more separate functions that do not need to participate in the jQuery chain, create a function on the fn property:

$.fn.setColor = function(color) {
 this.css("color", color);
 };


If you want your method to participate in the jQuery chain, assign your method to the fn property and then return the original jQuery object:


$.fn.increaseWidth = function() {
 return this.each(function() {
 var width = $(this).width() + 10;
 $(this).width(width);
 });
};


If your function uses the jQuery dollar sign function ($) and you’re concerned that the library could be used with other libraries that make use of $, wrap your function in an anonymous function:


;(function($) {
 $.fn.flashBlueRed = function() {
return this.each(function() {
 var hex = rgb2hex($(this).css("background-color"));
 if (hex == "#0000ff") {
 $(this).css("background-color", "#ff0000");
 } else {
 $(this).css("background-color", "#0000ff");
 }
 });
 };
})(jQuery);

EXPLAIN

It’s relatively simple to create a jQuery plug-in once you understand the nuances of the jQuery plugin infrastructure. If you’re interested in creating a jQuery method that can be used with a jQuery selector and participate in the jQuery chain, you’ll use syntax such as the following, which sets the function to the fn property, and returns the original jQuery object:


$.fn.increaseWidth = function() {
 return this.each(function() {
 var width = $(this).width() + 10;
 $(this).width(width);
 });
};


However, if you want to make use of the dollar sign function ($) within the code, but still have the plug-in work within a multiple library setting, wrap the method in an anonymous function:


;(function($) {
 $.fn.flashBlueRed = function() {
 return this.each(function() {
 var hex = rgb2hex($(this).css("background-color"));
 if (hex == "#0000ff") {
 $(this).css("background-color", "#ff0000");
 } else {
 $(this).css("background-color", "#0000ff");
 }
 });
 };
})(jQuery);


Notice the following line in both examples:

return this.each(function () {

This code is necessary to allow the method to work on whatever is returned by the selector, regardless of whether it’s a single item or a group of items.

The line begins the code block that includes your actual method code.If you’re only interested in adding a jQuery function that isn’t part of the jQuery chain, use the jQuery function syntax:

$.fn.setColor = function(color) {
 this.css("color", color);
 };

Once you have created your plug-in code, package it in a separate file; to use the code, all someone has to do is create a script reference to include the plugin source following the jQuery script.